Research

How common is prostate cancer?

Posted by  | Research

Prostate cancer is extremely common in the U.S. “It’s the most common life-threatening cancer in men, responsible for 26,000 deaths per year,” says William G. Nelson, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins. But there are a lot of prostate cancers that are not life-threatening, he says. “In autopsies(...)

Top Maryland scientists discuss research on tracking and treating cancer

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At the annual Research Matters conference yesterday, top scientists from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center discussed research using advanced imaging methods to develop better ways pinpoint and track cancer cells — down to the microscopic level — and precisely target each cell with anti-cancer drugs. Experts also delivered presentations(...)

Johns Hopkins Student Wins Top Prize For Research on Lethal Brain Tumors in Children

Johns Hopkins Student Wins Top Prize For Research on Lethal Brain Tumors in Children

Posted by  | Childhood Cancer, Research

Johns Hopkins undergraduate student Sabrina Wang won first place in a competition among 125 students for her research on a lethal type of pediatric brain tumor called atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT), the most common brain tumor type in infants. The award was presented at the AACR 2017 annual meeting in Washington, D.C., on April 2.(...)

Top Questions Ahead for Cancer Immunotherapy

Top Questions Ahead for Cancer Immunotherapy

Posted by  | Research

A decade ago, Suzanne Topalian, M.D., led a team of researchers who made an astonishing contribution to how cancer is fought. Many cancers can “put the brakes” on the body’s immune cells — cells that would normally storm into a tumor and destroy it. Topalian, director of the Melanoma Program at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel(...)

What’s next for bladder cancer research?

Posted by  | Research

The Johns Hopkins Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute recently announced a joint effort with the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN) to fund up to two awards totaling $100,000 for young scientists. As part of the announcement, the Institute's director, David McConkey, Ph.D., gave us his thoughts on recent bladder cancer advances and ongoing research. Recent advances, says McConkey, include(...)

Scientists let GENIE data “out of the bottle”

Posted by  | Research

Nearly 19,000 de-identified genomic records from cancer patients treated by an international group of hospitals, including the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, have been collected in a database coordinated by the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and are now available to scientists across the globe. The data was gathered from the genomic sequencing of(...)

5 Things We Learned About Immunotherapy This Year

Posted by  | Research

Immunotherapy has become one of the hottest areas of cancer research, and the number of cancers successfully treated by immunotherapy is growing. Nearing the end of 2016, there are now four FDA-approved immunotherapy drugs that target immune system checkpoints to treat six types of cancer. We asked Drew Pardoll, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Bloomberg~Kimmel(...)

President Obama Signs 21st Century Cures Act

Posted by  | Research

A ceremony was held yesterday at the White House to sign the 21st Century Cures Act, which authorizes $4.8 billion in National Institutes of Health funding for a broad range of biomedical initiatives, including cancer and precision medicine. Immunotherapy patient Stefani Joho [watch a video of Stefani's story] and Dr. Elizabeth Jaffee, deputy director of the(...)