Medical teams at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center on the Johns Hopkins Bayview campus “have to fight two battles in order to control the cancer,” says radiation oncologist says Russell K. Hales, M.D.

“The first is the local disease. A lung tumor is problematic, because as it grows, it can cause shortness of breath, coughing, or even cause bleeding with coughing,” Hales says.

“But lung cancer also can spread to other parts of the body, including the brain, lymph nodes, liver, bones, or other sites within the lung.  And that local disease, when it metastasizes, or spreads, can cause problems with the organ that it spreads to.  So when we think of how to fight lung cancer, we have to take in context two simultaneous battles for fighting.  Both of those have to be won, in order to win the war in a patient with lung cancer.”

Find out more from Dr. Hales about lung cancer, treatments for it, and innovative new research to help lung cancer patients in the free webinar, Lung Cancer: Serious Treatment for a Serious Cancer.

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