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Three Minutes with Oncologist Michael Carducci

Three Minutes with Oncologist Michael Carducci

Posted by  | caregiving, Issues & Perspectives, palliative care, Research

Michael Carducci, M.D., is the associate cancer center director for clinical research within the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and the regional research director for the Greater Washington, D.C., area for the Kimmel Cancer Center. In his many years as an oncologist, Carducci has expertise in various types of cancer including bladder, kidney, prostate and(...)

Starting a Conversation about Advance Directives

Starting a Conversation about Advance Directives

Posted by  | caregiving

Bright and early at 6 am on April 16th, Harry J. Duffey Family Patient and Family Services staff members greeted patients clad in t-shirts encouraging them to learn about advance directives. The effort was part of the National Healthcare Decisions Day “Start a Conversation Project” and is aimed at helping people understand advance directives and(...)

Palliative Care: Putting a Cloak on Cancer

Palliative Care: Putting a Cloak on Cancer

Posted by  | caregiving, palliative care, treatment

Palliative care addresses symptoms and distress accompanying serious illnesses. The field is emerging as a vital medical specialty in the multidisciplinary treatment of cancer. Better access to expert palliative care for all cancer patients must be a priority. Read Kimmel Cancer Center director William Nelson’s editorial in Cancer Today, a publication of the American Association(...)

What does palliative care during my cancer treatment do for my family caregivers?

Posted by  | caregiving, treatment

Palliative care isn’t just for cancer patients. The palliative care team can support your family and caregivers as well as you during your cancer treatment. Our expert team can provide your family and caregivers: A communication bridge to facilitate communication between you, your family and your treatment team; Relief for the stress, worry and sadness(...)

Does palliative care help me with more than cancer pain?

Posted by  | caregiving, treatment

While pain relief is important, relief of other symptoms such as nausea, fatigue and shortness of breath also may be a part of your palliative care. You might seek palliative care for emotional, social or spiritual support, rather than for your physical pain or symptoms. Care teams include experts such as physicians, nurses, social workers(...)

How do I decide whether to seek palliative care as a cancer patient?

Posted by  | caregiving, treatment

When you’re considering palliative care as part of your cancer treatment, consider these criteria for deciding whether it’s right for you. How severe is your illness? Palliative care addresses serious or chronic diseases, such as cancer, HIV/AIDS, and Alzheimer’s, among many other diseases. Do you need emotional, physical or spiritual support? Palliative care isn’t just for(...)

What is palliative care and what does it mean for me as a cancer patient?

Posted by  | caregiving, treatment

According to experts at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, palliative care is “ease without curing.” Its focus is improving the quality of life for seriously ill patients, helping you to carry on with your daily life while you undergo treatment, and helping you tolerate medical treatments. Palliative care includes three key approaches: • pain(...)

When and where should I apply for Social Security disability?

Posted by  | caregiving, Uncategorized

If you’re a cancer patient, you should apply for disability benefits as soon as you become disabled, according to social workers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. .  It can take months to process your application for either Social Security Disability or Supplemental Security Income. The Social Security Administration's eligibility screening tool is available online. If you(...)