Issues & Perspectives

Amy’s Diary

Posted by  | Issues & Perspectives, Survivorship, treatment

As oncologists, we encourage our patients to seek support wherever they can find it - family, friends, religious organizations, community groups... In the last decade or so, thanks to people like Amy Ohm, opportunities for support have begun to emerge on the Web. Several years ago, after Amy was diagnosed with melanoma, she looked online(...)

Part 2: Walk the Talk

Posted by  | Issues & Perspectives, Survivorship

It’s not every day that you commit to walking 40 miles in the heat and rain, but on April 30 of this year, I walked in my second D.C. Avon Walk for Breast Cancer as part of the Johns Hopkins Breast Center Team.  This quite a contrast from my humbling beginning 19 years ago with(...)

Why We Walk

Posted by  | Issues & Perspectives, Survivorship

Have you ever considered joining a walk/run/swim or other athletic event to benefit a cause that has special meaning to you?  I never thought that participating in my first event would become even more personal, and I didn’t anticipate that the bonds I formed would help me deal with my own issues. This is the(...)

What is Hope?

Posted by  | Childhood Cancer, Issues & Perspectives

What does it mean to have hope, to be hopeful? Each of us have our own very personal ways we might answer such a big question. But, what if you were a child with a cancer or a parent with a child who had cancer? What if you asked that question of a nurse or(...)

Frank and Ellen give back

Posted by  | Issues & Perspectives, Uncategorized

As an oncologist, my patients frequently talk to me about the ways they "give back." Frank Potepan fought lymphoma in the 1990s, and for the last several years has been involved in developing a local hospice program. For Frank and his wife, Ellen, it's a chance to show their gratitude and a rewarding and meaningful(...)

11 Million Strong

Posted by  | Issues & Perspectives, Survivorship

When I think of the word cancer, “celebration” is not the next word that immediately comes to mind. But, last Sunday, that’s exactly what cancer survivors at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center did. Cancer Survivors’ Day is an annual event that falls on the first Sunday in June. It’s a date recognized around the(...)

A Cancer Prevention Diet

Posted by  | Issues & Perspectives, Prevention/Screening

Last week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture replaced its traditional food pyramid with a new "plate icon" to help direct consumers on how to eat a healthy, balanced meal.  It turns out that an emphasis on fruits and vegetables can also be helpful in preventing cancer. In one segment of the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer(...)

4 Tips to Reduce Hair Loss

Posted by  | Issues & Perspectives, treatment

Some types of chemotherapy damage cells that cause hair growth. For some patients, losing their hair is one of the most emotional and upsetting parts of undergoing treatment. The good news is that hair almost always grows back 2 to 3 months after chemo is over. Since it usually takes about one or two weeks(...)

9 Tips for Managing Nausea

Posted by  | Issues & Perspectives, treatment

Nausea and vomiting can occur while getting chemotherapy, right after, or many hours or days later.  You’ll most likely feel better on the days you are not receiving chemo.  Here are 9 tips for managing your nausea: 1. Use a journal to record what causes your vomiting and nausea. Discuss this with your doctor or nurse.(...)

What is Compassion? It’s a Nurse.

Posted by  | Issues & Perspectives, Uncategorized

What is Compassion? It’s a Nurse. Compassion is defined as the awareness of the suffering of another, coupled with the wish to relieve that suffering. It isn’t something that can be taught. Compassion comes from the heart and it’s a quality that sets apart our cancer nurses. Our nurses put patients first by providing outstanding(...)