Antibody May Provide a Strategy Against Metastatic Bone Cancer

Posted by  | Research

An antibody drug that targets part of the bone growth pathway can slow the growth of human osteosarcoma implanted in mice and prevent the tumor from spreading to other parts of the body, according to a study led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists. Osteosarcoma is one of the most common bone tumors affecting children(...)

After surgery for lung cancer, how long will it be before I can safely receive other treatments like chemo and radiation? Will my cancer grow back during this time?

Posted by  | treatment

“Many lung cancers are not treated with one therapy alone,” says Russell K. Hales, M.D. “Sometimes it takes all three treatments—surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy-- to fully treat the lung cancer. And patients may be anxious after a surgery, about waiting in recovery for other treatments like chemotherapy and radiation.” Hales, who is a radiation oncologist(...)

What are the different types of lung cancer? Is one more serious than the other?

Posted by  | Uncategorized

The two main categories of lung cancer are small-cell lung cancer, and non-small-cell lung cancer, says Russell K. Hales, M.D. “Non-small cell lung cancer is further divided into adenocarcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. “All lung cancer is aggressive, but all cancer in its early stages can be treated, and patients can have long term control(...)

I was diagnosed with restrictive lung disease. My mother and my cat died of lung cancer. I’m a non-smoker but worried about environmental issues. How likely is it that this will become lung cancer, and what would the treatment be?

Posted by  | Prevention/Screening, Uncategorized

“It's not just smoking that leads to lung cancer,” says Russell K. Hales, M.D. “ We know that environmental exposures and underlying lung disease can increase the likelihood of lung cancer. Unfortunately, in patients with restrictive lung disease, we don't have any information to show that screening those patients will increase the likelihood of finding(...)

What is ground glass opacity on the lung? Is it likely to be cancer and how do you determine whether it is or not?

Posted by  | Prevention/Screening

“Not everything that arises in the lung is cancer,” says Russell K. Hales, M.D., a radiation oncologist, at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center on the Johns Hopkins Bayview campus. “A nodule in the lung can be from infection, irritation, or inflammation. It can be from other diseases, unrelated to cancer at all.” Hales notes(...)

Two Studies Uncover Potential Treatments for Lethal Pediatric Brain Cancer DIPG

Two Studies Uncover Potential Treatments for Lethal Pediatric Brain Cancer DIPG

Posted by  | Childhood Cancer, Research

A rare cell line developed by Johns Hopkins researchers is giving scientists their first chance in decades to test new therapies for a lethal pediatric brain cancer that has few treatments. Kimmel Cancer Center scientist Eric H. Raabe, M.D., Ph.D., helped to develop the diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) cell line, grown from tumor tissue donated by(...)

Side effects of immunotherapy: what to look for and when?

Side effects of immunotherapy: what to look for and when?

Posted by  | treatment

Julie Brahmer, M.D., director of the Thoracic Oncology Program, began treating patients with immunotherapy drugs nearly a decade ago. She led one of the first large studies of the popular drugs, which was reported in 2012. Since then, Brahmer, a program leader in the Bloomberg-Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, has become an expert in identifying(...)

Palliative medicine focus at #ASCO16 meeting

Palliative medicine focus at #ASCO16 meeting

Posted by  | treatment, Uncategorized

Tom Smith, M.D., wants cancer patients to live well. Fewer side effects, better quality of life, more joyful time with family…these are among the primary goals, he says, of palliative medicine. Researchers have studied the impact of palliative medicine programs on patients’ outcomes, and results show that patients benefit, says Smith. “A lot of aggressive(...)

Can biomarkers predict patients’ response to immunotherapy?

Posted by  | Research

Immunotherapy expert, Suzanne Topalian, M.D., delivered a presentation to a standing room only crowd at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology (#ASCO16) regarding new directions in scientists’ search for biomarkers that identify patients and tumor types most likely to respond to immunotherapy drugs. Among the approaches is an immunohistochemistry test for the protein PD-L1,(...)