Washington Post Cancer Summit: A Silent Epidemic: The rise of HPV-related cancers

Posted by  | Issues & Perspectives, Prevention/Screening, Research

Akila Viswanathan, M.D., executive vice chair of Johns Hopkins Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, was part of a panel discussion on the rise of HPV-related cancers. The panel was just one section of the Washington Post Cancer Summit. Viswanathan was joined by other experts in taking look at rising HPV-related cancer rates in the(...)

Cancer Matters with Dr. Bill Nelson – Managing the Adverse Effects of Immunotherapy Treatment

Cancer Matters with Dr. Bill Nelson – Managing the Adverse Effects of Immunotherapy Treatment

Posted by  | podcast

In our next podcast, Dr Bill Nelson speaks to Dr Jarushka Naidoo about monitoring and treating the side effects of cancer immunotherapy treatment. In this preview, Dr Bill Nelson speaks to Dr Jarushka Naidoo about monitoring and treating the side effects of cancer immunotherapy treatment. To listen to the entire podcast, click here: https://bit.ly/2QKMFuo

Kimmel in DC with Dr. Ben Levy – Integrative Medicine

Kimmel in DC with Dr. Ben Levy – Integrative Medicine

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Dr Ben Levy talks with Dr Rosanne Sheinberg and Harpreet Gujral about the care options offered to patients at Sibley Integrative Medicine. Visit them online at sibley.org/integrative.   In this preview, they describe integrative medicine and how it can benefit patients undergoing cancer treatment. To listen to the full podcast, click here: https://bit.ly/2Qxa1nd

Cancer Matters with Dr. Bill Nelson – Pediatric Radiation and Proton Therapy

Cancer Matters with Dr. Bill Nelson – Pediatric Radiation and Proton Therapy

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Dr Bill Nelson speaks with Dr Matt Ladra, the Director of Pediatric Oncology at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington DC, about using radiation and proton therapy to treat children with cancer. In this preview, Dr Ladra explains the advantages proton therapy offers children by limiting the side effects often caused by traditional radiation treatments. To(...)

Why Do People Get Cancer?

Posted by  | Issues & Perspectives

Adult cancers tend to be a little different from childhood cancers, and trying to explain the disease to a young person adds to the separation. Dr. Donald Small, director of pediatric oncology at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, said cancer in children is rare, and most are treatable. But trying to explain a cancer(...)