Starting in 2002, more than 50,000 current and former smokers aged 55 to 74 signed up for the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) at Johns Hopkins and more than 30 other sites across the nation.  The trial was to last 10 years, but eight years into the study, leaders of the trial found their results thus far were significant enough to stop the trial and announce their findings.

Continue reading “CT Scans Reduce Lung Cancer Deaths by 20 Percent” »

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This post is written by Lillie Shockney, the Administrative Director of the Johns Hopkins Avon Foundation Breast Center and a two-time breast cancer survivor.

Completing Treatment - Time to Celebrate?

You'd think so. You've been through surgery, perhaps chemo and radiation, maybe on or completing hormonal therapy and you are finally "done" breast cancer treatment. So ready for a party?  Most will say no. Why? Though most of you (and me) are thrilled to be done treatment, the idea of celebrating sounds some how risky. I spoke to a woman today who had just finished her treatment. She said, "I'd love to have a party but don't want to jinx myself-you know, the cancer might come back. "  And thus the fear of recurrence, whether it be local recurrence (back in the breast or chest area where it started) or distant recurrence (in the form of metastatic disease with breast cancer springing up in another organ) paralyzes women from feeling comfortable with celebrating this mammoth job they have completed-- overcoming breast cancer. Continue reading “Completion of Treatment — Time to Celebrate?” »

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The following blog post was submitted and written by representatives at the Lustgarten Foundation.  Johns Hopkins and the Sanger Institute published two papers in the journal Nature describing how pancreatic cancer develops far more slowly than once thought.  Major media outlets covering the news included The New York Times, Bloomberg News, Reuters, CBS NewsScience News, WebMD and Health Day.  Read the Johns Hopkins' news release for more information.

The Lustgarten Foundation, the nation’s largest private funder of pancreatic cancer research, applauds the work of cooperating investigators at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions and the Sanger Institute on their groundbreaking research in the area of pancreatic cancer. The studies, which were reported online Wednesday, October 27, in Nature, affirm early detection and screening as promising areas of investigation that hold significant potential for saving lives.

Continue reading “Let’s Beat Pancreatic Cancer Together” »

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In this month's Cancer News Review podcast, Cancer Center director Bill Nelson reviews top headlines in cancer research.  Each of the studies discussed here were published in the Oct. 2 issue of the Lancet.

Continue reading “Top Cancer Research News: October” »

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Elissa Bantug

Elissa Bantug

One of the most common complaints I hear from cancer survivors is a change in their sex life.  Within days after returning home from my mastectomy, I attempted to be intimate with my husband even though I had yet to regain the ability to dress or shower myself with medical drains still attached. I thought this would be good idea but my husband briskly pushed me away.  This was yet another blow to my already very fragile state.

Continue reading “Finding the Spark Again After Cancer” »

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The final score was 3-0 last night at my son's soccer game -- his team won, but not because they have a single star that makes all the goals; rather, they worked together to make a collective effort in winning the game.

The soccer community is now rallying their global fans and participants in a match against the world's biggest killer -- cancer.  That's what it takes to beat this disease - many people working together to make an impact on a very complicated and tough adversary.  Every bit counts, because when we add up each of our individual efforts, we can make a greater impact.

  Continue reading “Give Cancer a Red Card” »

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Elissa Bantug

Elissa Bantug

In a conversation with a patient recently, she said to me, “I am a mother and a wife, but when I think of what describes me most, it is that I am a cancer survivor.  Having had cancer is the first thing I think about when I get up in the morning, the last thing I think about before going to bed, and is something that I am reminded of all throughout my day.” Continue reading “Putting Cancer in Its Place” »

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Elissa Bantug

Elissa Bantug

Defining when a patient becomes a cancer “survivor” seems to vary depending on whom you ask.  Some people say that this term can be applied after a patient has shown no evidence of disease for five years; others assert that survivor is a status achieved following the patient’s completion of all recommended treatments and surgeries.  The National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship (NCCS) states:  “An individual is considered a cancer survivor from the time of diagnosis, through the balance of his or her life. Family members, friends, and caregivers are also impacted by the survivorship experience and are therefore included in this definition.”  Continue reading “Cancer Survivorship” »

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Of all the hard hat colors to choose from, you wouldn't think construction workers would opt to wear pink ones.  But that's just what they did at Johns Hopkins to honor breast cancer awareness month.  Construction employees of EMCOR Group, Inc., a mechanical and electrical construction company, who are working at Hopkins on what is believed to be the largest hospital redevelopment project in the country, stood side-by-side with breast cancer survivors, physicians and nurses to form a human pink ribbon on the construction site of our new clinical towers.  Hats off to our construction workers -- thanks for helping us build a better future for cancer patients.

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It was the culmination of years of effort by many scientists and physicians and the bravery of patients to try something new that has brought some steady hope in an experimental therapy called epigenetics.

Continue reading “What Matters to You?” »

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