Prevention/Screening

What is ground glass opacity on the lung? Is it likely to be cancer and how do you determine whether it is or not?

Posted by  | Prevention/Screening

“Not everything that arises in the lung is cancer,” says Russell K. Hales, M.D., a radiation oncologist, at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center on the Johns Hopkins Bayview campus. “A nodule in the lung can be from infection, irritation, or inflammation. It can be from other diseases, unrelated to cancer at all.” Hales notes(...)

A Conversation about Cancer

A Conversation about Cancer

Posted by  | precision medicine, Prevention/Screening, Research, Uncategorized

On Nov. 3, 2015, a capacity crowd of more than 250 Johns Hopkins leaders, faculty, staff, students, donors, and other guests filled the Albert H. Owens Auditorium at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center to honor the philanthropy of Sidney Kimmel for advancing cancer discovery and care. Hundreds more watched via video streaming as Kimmel(...)

Doctors Disagree on Breast Cancer Screening Recommendations

Posted by  | Prevention/Screening

Yesterday's announcement from the United States Preventive Services Task Force of its final recommendations on breast cancer screenings was met with disagreement from many doctors who specialize in breast imaging. Dr. Susan Harvey, director of Breast Imaging at Johns Hopkins joined others who said the announcement will not change their own practices. "What this controversy(...)

New, less invasive way to evaluate lymph nodes helps patients at risk of lung cancer

Posted by  | Prevention/Screening

A new, less invasive way to evaluate lymph nodes in patients at risk of lung cancer is finding more tumors within lymph nodes than previous procedures, says Russell K. Hales, M.D., a radiation oncologist, at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center on the Johns Hopkins Bayview campus. To evaluate lymph nodes, lung cancer physicians traditionally(...)

New lung cancer screening with CT scans, tested at Hopkins, finds tumors earlier and saves lives

Posted by  | Prevention/Screening

In many cancers, early screening has helped improve your chances of a successful outcome when cancer is detected. But lung cancer has not had that type of effective screening tool until last year,  says Russell K. Hales, M.D.,  a radiation oncologist at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center on the Johns Hopkins Bayview campus, a(...)

If You Think E-Cigarettes Aren’t Bad For You, Think Again

Posted by  | Prevention/Screening, Uncategorized

In this technological era, I suppose it should not be all that surprising that even our bad habits have gotten a techy remake.  E-cigarettes, battery-operated devices that simulate smoking by vaporizing a liquid solution containing nicotine as well as added flavors have hit the market with storm.  Vaping—the term for the use of these electronic(...)

Our Story of Cancer: Further Gains in Preventing, Treating and Curing Cancer in the Near Future

Posted by  | Prevention/Screening, Research, treatment

We've asked our staff to share their thoughts on the PBS documentary, Cancer: Emperor of All Maladies. This week, we'll post their comments, including how they hope it will influence the public dialogue on cancer, research and treatment. Terry Langbaum, MHS, Chief Administrative Officer at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, shares her thoughts: We are hoping(...)

Do you have any Lung Cancer Risk Factors?

Posted by  | Prevention/Screening

*This post was written by Marie Borsellino, B.S.N., R.N., O.C.N., oncology nurse navigator for the Managing Cancer at Work Program. Cigarette smoking is the most important risk factor in the development of lung cancer. It is estimated that as many as 90 percent of lung cancer diagnoses could be prevented if cigarette smoking were eliminated.(...)