About Valerie Matthews-Mehl

Posts by Valerie Matthews-Mehl:

Gene Friday Series: Prevention is Cure


This blog is the final post of our four-part "Gene" Fridays series on cancer genetics. The dream Dr. Bert Vogelstein and his team hope to realize is prevention.  He doesn’t expect to prevent cancers from occurring, but by using cancer genome sequencing, he believes there is an opportunity to prevent cancer deaths.  He envisions safe, simple, and(...)

Gene Friday Series: The Encyclopedia Analogy


This blog is part 3 of 4 of our "Gene" Fridays series on cancer genetics. To help people understand the complexity of cancer and the series of genetic events that lead to its formation, Dr. Bert Vogelstein built upon the encyclopedia analogy. “Each of us has an encyclopedia in our cells, and each page of that(...)

Kimmel in the Community


Kimmel Cancer Center employees at the Living Classrooms Foundation A “Kimmel in the Community” team spent the afternoon on May 29, 2013, at the Living Classrooms Foundation on Caroline Street in East Baltimore and helped clean up its East Harbor campus.  As part of the Kimmel Cancer Center’s 40th anniversary celebration, the volunteers, led by(...)

Waiting Room Observations


Over the last thirty years, about every decade I’ve found myself in a cancer center waiting room--first in 1984 with my husband, in 1999 with my father, and now this year with my mother.  Last week, I accompanied my mother on her regular visit.  It was a busy day in the clinic, and as I(...)

Top Three Lifestyle Changes to Prevent Cancer


Important Tips from Cancer Prevention and Control Expert Dr. Elizabeth Platz Focus on changing your lifestyle behaviors where we have evidence of a strong link. Often these lifestyle changes can also reduce your risk for other major chronic diseases, like heart disease and diabetes. You might as well get the most from your efforts, so(...)

Sequencing our Genes: Is Cancer Written in our DNA?


This is the first blog in a three-part series about Genome Sequencing and Predicting Cancer. Technology called next generation sequencing can be used to reveal an individual’s complete and entire DNA (whole genome).  Right now, it costs about $5,000 to sequence an individual’s whole genome, but the price tag is decreasing rapidly. With its increasing(...)